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Pete J.

Member Since 07 May 2007
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 07:50 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: PLEASE READ DECANTING RATTLE CANS

21 November 2014 - 06:43 AM

A fancy-schmancy method to shotgun a beer, eh?


Pretty much. This just allows you to control the rate of release of the gas. Turn the screw in to make a hole and then open it in small increments to slowly release the propellant. I got the idea from a saddle valve.

In Topic: PLEASE READ DECANTING RATTLE CANS

20 November 2014 - 07:38 PM

There is a better way to decant paint and that is making holes in the can, but it is not recommended because no matter what I say, there is always someone who won't follow instructions and will hurt themselves. If you happen to have machining capability you can create a safe way to do it. I assume no responsibility for others doing this. Build this jig at your own risk, and no, I will not make one for anyone and no I won't send out plans. It is just my idea but remember you are releasing a flamible liquid and gas. This is no more dangerous than what Bret Greene suggested in the above video. NO IGNITION SOURSES around if you do it!
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In Topic: spark plug wire boots, where please?

20 November 2014 - 06:09 AM

I need a good source for plug wire boot material.  I know someone out there in TV land can help me!  I could buy a nice pair of wire-strippers from "Micro Mark" but I donwanna.  (It's rough out there!)


It sounds like money is the issue. There are a lot of cheaper ways to do things than buying premade pieces. Back in the day, before all the aftermarket stuff, modelers had to rely on their own skill and ability to create stuff like sparkplug boots. We would get two different sizes of wire. One the correct plug wire size and one the that insulation is just large enough to slip over the plug wire. Strip off a piece of the second insulation long enough to make all the boots plus a little. Then use a hobby knife or single edge razor to cut boots. Slid them over the plug wire and just a tiny drop of glue to hold it in place. Oh, and before your put the boot on, strip a small piece of insulation off the plug wire to expose a bit of the wire. That gives you something to glue the plug wire into the head or distributor with. You don't need fancy tools or expensive after market stuff, just a little time and patients. Old school man!

Oh and by the way, any electronics store or hobby store that sells beading supplies is a good source for wire. Buying it by the spool is much cheaper than the prepackaged stuff the aftermarket guys sell.

In Topic: Name that movie quote

19 November 2014 - 02:25 PM

"I have always been, and forever shall be...your friend".


Star trek-Into the darkness

In Topic: When do you stop building for yourself & start building for the hobby?

14 November 2014 - 07:51 AM

I would like the forum's opinion on this subject.
When does someone become so popular in the hobby that they can no longer cut corners & "build for themselves" and have to take it to the next level. Whether that means learning & properly displaying mechanicals or take a step back & execute ALL the details properly instead of just 90%-ing details for the sake of them being on the model. What is the opinion of the board?"


It always surprises me when a thread like this comes up. I know a few of the "popular" modelers and they are in some respects a different breed. I think that those who just see the builds and description assume that it has to be some external force driving them. This, in my experience, just isn't so. The reality is that they don't build to compete with others or generally build to others expectations. It just isn't in them. They do so because they truly enjoy taking their modeling to the next level. They enjoy finding something that they never tried before and succeeding at doing it. They could no more sit down and build to a lesser standard than a pig could fly. It is not in their nature. The other assumption is that doing this is not fun. To them it is. The fun in the hobby for them is in the experience of learning that new technique or getting something just right or mastering a new medium. Like everybody on this board they are having fun, just in their own way. If you don't see what they are doing as fun it doesn't matter, they do, and frankly most are very willing to share that with you if you let them.