Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Article on the Hemmings blog about the changing face of car collecting, which I imagine would also affect what people want in the way of car models.

https://www.hemmings.com/blog/article/changing-demographics/

Most of it seems to follow conventional wisdom.  Less interest in classics and fifties cars, and more interest in eighties cars and Japanese imports, but there is apparently a growing interest in Brass era cars among MIllenials.

So maybe the real way to get young people back in the hobby isn't in making kits of the latest from Detroit, but to offer a decent Pungs-Finch.

06-Pungs-Finch-Limited-DV-09-AI-01.jpg

Edited by Richard Bartrop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interest in Brass-era cars goes hand-in-hand with millennials' penchant for dressing up like Snipes, the lovable sociopathic 19th century newsboy,

image.png.9bb2cea59363da8e85c298c9c2da4a74.png

and riding Penny Farthings in Prospect Park.

image.png.94b5e81a05f5a7aa0a2b3161641e0912.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Very odd about the interest in brass era cars.  Maybe something related to the interest in Edison bulbs, artesianal beards, craft drinks, etc?    Were I to dabble in car collecting it would be the cars of my youth--80s cars, maybe with a couple 70s cars..  

Edited by Rob Hall

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't help but notice when I've gone to car shows in the last several years, I do see less and less '50's cars and more of the '70's to '80's cars. Time marches on and before you know it, the '00's cars (yes they'll be collectible) will be showing up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The supply is drying up; so, there are less and less '50s cars to go around. Sorta like life-size equivalents of Johan kits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That would depend on your personal tastes and playlists.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, magicmustang said:

And "Rap Music" will be the Golden Oldies.

Now there's a trend death that I really look forward to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The faux-hemian retro-geeks garbed in 19th century newsboy clothing and riding Penny Farthings has happened; so, nothing is off the table.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a beautiful car!  Really hope no one wants to steampunk it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's hard to afford a "brass era" car when you're living in your mom's basement trying to figure out how to cash in on your anthropology degree! :D

 

You would never know that interest in '50s cars is waning by looking at the prices that a restored '55 Belair will bring today.

 

 

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, bbowser said:

That's a beautiful car!  Really hope no one wants to steampunk it

Don't bet on that. Quirky new takes on the classic ________ (fill in the blank with whatever comes to mind) is a specialty of Mr. Salty-physiqued, pipe cleaner-limbed, bearded bed bug incubators. I've seen some really atrocious automotive horrors, which used to be nice looking classic 50s-60s classics, turned into motorized macaroni art projects and the like around here. I could see them turning this into a rolling latte foam machine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those 1950's Hot Rod prices are the last Gasp of the Original "Hot Rod Generation". They can still afford the nose-bleed prices.

I would guess that the average age now for the fellow who lusts for a Cherry '55, is over 65 years. There may be a few younger fans, but they represent the tail of the bell-curve, IMHO. As the 70/80 year old OG guys pass, the number of people who want their street rod, and can AFFORD what they (or the family) are asking for the street rod, is going to shrink.  I foresee a slow drift down in prices. AMBR Award winners and other foolishness, will be kept afloat by the Deep Pocket types who in habit the Top End of any hobby, but the more numerous "daily driver" rides, are eventually going to return to cheaper pricing. At last Years Hot Rod Reunion at Famoso Raceway, the Grey Beards out number the more youthful guys by about a 5 -1 ratio. And out a crowd of many hundreds, there were no more than 2 dozen or so under the age of 40 who owned anything. That is the 'tell'.   Wanting one, and owning one, are very different things.

I see some who want, few who own. The Fad of the Over 100K, Checkbook Hot Rod, is self-limiting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, magicmustang said:

And "Rap Music" will be the Golden Oldies.

I started feeling old when early 90s grunge/alternative rock from my college years started being referred to as Classic Rock on radio...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Rob Hall said:

Very odd about the interest in brass era cars.  Maybe something related to the interest in Edison bulbs, artesianal beards, craft drinks, etc?    Were I to dabble in car collecting it would be the cars of my youth--80s cars, maybe with a couple 70s cars..  

I can relate!  Here is my mid-80s classic Caddy.

85_Eldo_02.jpg

It is 35 years, old but the old fogies at the car shows will never consider it a "classic car". In their eyes, classics stop in the '60s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe the interest in brass cars is due to the boring cars we have today.  I like cars of all eras, but very few built after 1999.  That seemed to be the end of cars with interior colors other than the black, tan and gray.  SInce most cars today are 4-doors, and the designs are mediocre for the most part, I'll be gone before these boremobiles are collectible! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just turned 39 the other day, I'm either the last Gen X or the first Millennial depending on when exactly they pin the transition. I grew up in a car household and caught the bug early. My main interests were 60s muscle cars but now that I'm in a financial position to own a project car the prices are astronomical for ones that don't need a ton of work and I don't have the space to do a full restoration on something. So I've decided to have a more attainable project car. My 98 SC300 has hit classic age and has the low production numbers that might make it collectable some day. Its Supra cousin is going through the roof right now and the SC community is debating when or if the SC will start to be brought along for the ride. 

20180703_115213.jpg.39a2f8b56cde9d4022de0dc29f7ae3ee.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Motor City said:

Maybe the interest in brass cars is due to the boring cars we have today.  I like cars of all eras, but very few built after 1999.  That seemed to be the end of cars with interior colors other than the black, tan and gray.  SInce most cars today are 4-doors, and the designs are mediocre for the most part, I'll be gone before these boremobiles are collectible! 

I wouldn't worry about it too much.

Anything built before 1995 is now considered an "antique" or "collectable", yet you're not going to go to a car show and see rows of 1991 Oldsmobiles or 1987 Dodges at any point in the future.

These cars will never be collectable, they just become junk.........and then the next generation of "boremobiles".

 

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

I wouldn't worry about it too much.

Anything built before 1995 is now considered an "antique" or "collectable", yet you're not going to go to a car show and see rows of 1991 Oldsmobiles or 1987 Dodges at any point in the future.

These cars will never be collectable, they just become junk.........and then the next generation of "boremobiles".

 

 

Steve

I have a 20 year old son that is very involved in a local car culture. He has rebuilt multiple engines. He helps his friends swap engine/trans/rear ends on a regular basis. Two years ago he brought a 62 GMC 1/2 ton back to life after it had sat since the 90's and then drove it 250 miles round trip to a Good Guys car show.

Most of his friends would love to own a 60's mid size 2dr but they don't cost $1,000 like they used to. Most of them are into 80's Camaros, G body GM and Fox body Mustangs because that is what you CAN buy for $1,000. My son sold the GMC and now has a 81 Mercury RS T-top car with a swapped in 5.0/5spd. The drivetrain is built from mostly used parts and the car runs low 14's on pump gas. 

My son does live in the basement - he pays rent. He is a 2nd year electricians apprentice, he has a 401k and is saving over 1/2 of his income towards a down payment. But I digress.

Carmak

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Carmak said:

I have a 20 year old son that is very involved in a local car culture. He has rebuilt multiple engines. He helps his friends swap engine/trans/rear ends on a regular basis. Two years ago he brought a 62 GMC 1/2 ton back to life after it had sat since the 90's and then drove it 250 miles round trip to a Good Guys car show.

Most of his friends would love to own a 60's mid size 2dr but they don't cost $1,000 like they used to. Most of them are into 80's Camaros, G body GM and Fox body Mustangs because that is what you CAN buy for $1,000. My son sold the GMC and now has a 81 Mercury RS T-top car with a swapped in 5.0/5spd. The drivetrain is built from mostly used parts and the car runs low 14's on pump gas. 

My son does live in the basement - he pays rent. He is a 2nd year electricians apprentice, he has a 401k and is saving over 1/2 of his income towards a down payment. But I digress.

Carmak

 

That's one. ;)

 

I'm not saying that there aren't going to be a few Camaros or Corvettes, etc,  from that period restored, But I feel pretty safe in saying that it will never be to the scale of the cars from the '30s to the '70s.

You are now beginning to see a lot more 4 door hard tops and sedans, station wagons etc, from that period in history being rescued.

I doubt very much that you're going to see many of these restored.

 

image.png.3087e19b9f7d22159db527d0d16ab5dc.png

 

 

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

I wouldn't worry about it too much.

Anything built before 1995 is now considered an "antique" or "collectable", yet you're not going to go to a car show and see rows of 1991 Oldsmobiles or 1987 Dodges at any point in the future.

These cars will never be collectable, they just become junk.........and then the next generation of "boremobiles".

Steve

As my ownership of the '85 Eldorado indicates, I disagree.  Not only it has an elegant and pleasing body design, it has lots of innovative features (for when it was produced).  I also get lots of positive comments at the car shows I attend.  Not boring at all.  It also still have that "boat like"' ride that none of today's cars have.  And it even handles fairly well for what it is.  It is a collectible to me.

I would actually give more attention to either of the cars you mentioned at a car show than to another '57 Chevy, or a '65 Vette.  And age-wise, I'm in my my mid-50's. I guess it is all relative.

Edited by peteski

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, peteski said:

As my ownership of the '85 Eldorado indicates, I disagree.  Not only it has an elegant and pleasing body design, it has lots of innovative features (for when it was produced).  I also get lots of positive comments at the car shows I attend.  Not boring at all.  It also still have that "boat like"' ride that none of today's cars have.  And it even handles fairly well for what it is.  It is a collectible to me.

I would actually give more attention to either of the cars you mentioned at a car show than to another '57 Chevy, or a '65 Vette.  And age-wise, I'm in my my mid-50's. I guess it is all relative.

To each his own, but I still maintain that you are never going to see cars from the 80s and 90s restored and maintained in the numbers that you see cars from the 50s and 60s.

Cars from that era just had a style and flair that later cars did not.

 

They were also made of steel with few plastic parts and no electronics to speak of to try to restore.

Can you imagine trying to find a the plastic bumper cover for the Olds pictured above in another 20 years, let alone right now?

You can basically build a '57 Chevy from scratch with all of the after market parts available today.

I doubt highly that you will see that kind of aftermarket support for the later cars.

So you see, it's not only about the desire to restore these later cars, but it's going to be just as much about whether or not you will have the ability to do so.

 

I have a 1:1 1969 Pontiac Grand Prix, and after over 50 years of waiting, there are still very few after market parts being produced, and old salvageable parts are extremely difficult to find.

It will be that much more difficult when half of the parts that you are seeking are plastic.

 

 

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, StevenGuthmiller said:

I have a 1:1 1969 Pontiac Grand Prix, and after over 50 years of waiting, there are still very few after market parts being produced, and old salvageable parts are extremely difficult to find.

It will be that much more difficult when half of the parts that you are seeking are plastic.

Steve

I hear you Steve. When I crunched the front of my GP. The bumper cost a fortune. The used fiberglass header panel needed a bit of work and I consider myself very lucky to be able to purchase new aftermarket turn signal lenses. Ames only had ONE of one side and Year One only had ONE of the other side. The grille will NEVER be reproduced and cannot be made from scratch like body sheetmetal can. That is why I have a small stash of these parts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Don't know about restorations, but I bet low-mile cherries will always have some following. As I've mentioned, my friend in CA has over 200 cars now, brass era to recent - many of them low mile cars exercised just enough to keep the juices flowing. There's an 11,000-mile red with bordello-red velour '86 Sable among them. Somebody had to save it...

Edited by ChrisBcritter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...