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cruz

Panel Lines Tutorial

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Guys, all the washing and scribing I do is first accomplished on the BARE plastic, I do not wash the lines after adding primer. I scribe them very deep and after that I do not have to touch them anymore. Not after primer, basecoats or even clear, it's as simple as that. That is exactly the idea behind scribing them deeply. Neither the primer, paint nor clear touch the scribed/washed lines and that goes with any paint. No matter how dark the wash is, if you look at the pictures of the completed model you will notice that they don't end up as dark as the lines on the bare plastic. That's the magic of this system. You can use dark purple if you want and you won't even need to worry about that.

Now, let's say you want to give them a wash after painting. No problem, again, the lines are so deeply scribed that the actual wash will still look realistic and realistic is what we are going for here.

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Edited by cruz

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This is a model painted with Tamiya White which will more clearly show the washed lines. Notice the different angles, just like a real car, the lines slightly disappear as you move the car around. Now, take some time and go outside and walk around your 1/1 car. Nothing different. That's what I like about this system.....

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Sorry but you can put all the links you want and the pictures in this thread don't lie, no need to look anywhere else. Thanks for the tutorial Cruz.

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Hi Marcos. Really like the tutorial. In the past, I used pencil to mark the panel lines as in the example of the Olds

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Now I'm trying the scribe method with a Dodge Coronet

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I will be interested to see how it all turns out.

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just seen a videos where a guys is using a dental explorer( i think thats the corect name) as a panel line scribber, can be a good cheap solution to a panel line scribber?? or just grab the tamiya one an do the correct thing?

since to me seems to be pretty similars, just that isnt as sharp as the scribber

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I've been using an almost identical method for over a decade now, and love the results. I don't have a scriber, I just use the backside of a used (it doesn't need to be sharp) Xacto blade for everything. I shoot for going about 1/2 to 2/3 of the way through the plastic. I don't have any special "wash," I just use whatever flat or matte black paint is on hand and wipe the excess off with rubbing alcohol. Non-moving body seams (fender caps, rocker panels, etc.) I don't scribe nearly as deeply, and I don't put any black in those. For white or light yellow etc paint jobs, I'll use a medium gray paint for the "wash" instead of black.

Excellent tutorial, excellent topic, excellent thread. I almost want to cry when I see a nice model where this hasn't been done but the guy just ran some black into the kit door lines at the end of the build. That almost looks worse than doing nothing at all.

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I screwed the pooch on the AMT 1969 Chevelle SS-396 Convertible that I'm working on . In my artistic mania , I was too focused on , How does that custom version fascia look ? In the process , I forget the most basic first-in-line improvement : the flippin' panel lines !! Now there's a little too much primer in the trunk lines and the doors' lines ( I shaved the door handles and needed some light coats of grey-then-red oxide primer as a guide ; that filled the faint door lines in short order ! Then I sprayed the same alternating-colours-of-primer on the quarters ( those needed some massaging ) and the fenders ( along the tops only ) . Of course the primer got-into the trunk lines ; again , they're faint to begin with .) .

This oversight on my part reminds me of that saying : "Until you walk a mile in another man's shoes , you can't lead a horse to water ."

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I LOVE the info on the scribed method............works VERY well!  ALSO, for those looking for the prototypical results of copying a 1:1 example, remember to check out the REAL 1:1 vehicle for where all the panel join lines are. MANY plastic kits do not include all of the panel lines. A perfect example is the AMT R600 Mack truck and the Ertl/MPC DM600 and DM800 kits. Those kit cabs do not show the panel lines on the cab as they are perfectly smooth where the seams should be, as if they were all filled in with bondo. Check out a 1:1 version and see them on the drivers side in front of the door; on the rocker panels; or on the cowl beneath the windshield. Those lines are where the individual panels are joined to make the cab. They are a VERY obvious part of the 1:1 truck, and should be added to the scale model. Just a pointer, but one VERY easily done with the scribing method.

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Using a fine tip marker like a Nano-liner or Gundam marker will also work .

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~bump~  Hope you don't mind me stepping on your lawn.

Since this was originally written, a tool type that has been released is a chisel, a little different than a panel scriber.  Just an idea, create an updated tutorial using this new tool.  They are not easy to find, been looking when I think of it.  Tamiya makes several widths.

I've used the #11 blade technique before, can get away with using only this.  I will try painting in the groove before painting from now on!

I have also used a pen, Micron (Sakura Color Products Corp.) 005 (0.20mm) archival ink black has worked well, and I also use it around things like side lights.

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1 hour ago, 89AKurt said:

I've used the #11 blade technique before, can get away with using only this.  I will try painting in the groove before painting from now on!

That's what I do--#11 (old blade) backside, run black into the grooves BEFORE paint, then paint as normal and forget about them. No further attention need be paid until it's time to clean polishing compound out of the lines with a toothbrush under warm running water. B)

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I did the #11 trick today, before painting primer.  :D

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Scribing is definitely the way to go especially if rattle canning. Something that helps as a guide is Dymo brand label tape.

 

 

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