Jump to content
Model Cars Magazine Forum

Installing clear parts without fogging: How!


Recommended Posts

What’s the best way to install clear parts, windscreens, headlights, etc., without causing fogging or leaving unsightly glue residue behind?  
I’ve been using regular Tamiya Cement.
Thanks for the help.  
Stay safe and enjoy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aircraft canopy glue, Elmer's White glue, Mod-Podge, whatever of those things you can get in Japan. They are all basically a water-based clear drying glue. They won't fog and they will wipe off if you get some on the glass.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup...but all those have poor wet strength.

They'll hold headlight lenses in place wet, but windows need to fit well and often need to be jigged or taped in place while the glue dries.

Some people prefer epoxy, but it can be messy, fingerprinty, and difficult to get a good accurate mix of the two parts in very small quantities.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is a type of CA that is mainly for Styrofoam and also for those of us who can't tolerate the fumes given off by CA. This is all I use for all clear "glass" and lenses, both the thin and the thick depending on the fit-up. It won't fog but you still must be skillful applying it.  I will often use zip kicker while holding the glass in place. Its expensive, not as strong as regular CA, and it has a short shelf life ( it thickens in the bottle after a year or so) but it works and its a viable alternative to the white glues.. IMG_2662.thumb.jpg.288bd9113c9aee8150c64b66bf15ffa8.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Ace-Garageguy said:

Yup...but all those have poor wet strength.

They'll hold headlight lenses in place wet, but windows need to fit well and often need to be jigged or taped in place while the glue dries.

Some people prefer epoxy, but it can be messy, fingerprinty, and difficult to get a good accurate mix of the two parts in very small quantities.

I use 2 part epoxy for almost everything.

I prefer it because I can mix it up, apply it to one of the surfaces to be mated, let it cure for five or ten minutes until it begins to tack up, and then glue the parts together.

This minimizes "squeeze out".

Then I let the parts set for a few minutes, rechecking periodically to readjust if necessary.

After 20 or 30 minutes, the parts are very securely fastened together.

 

 

 

 

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I actually use Testors red tube cement but sparingly ONLY on a couple of hidden places with a toothpick to "tack weld" the window in place initially.

I usually clamp it in place with wooden clothes pins.

The next day I use Testors window maker and wick it around the perimeter of the window on one or two sides depending.

On subsequent days I apply it until the entire perimeter is sealed.

Window maker has no solvent reaction whatsoever, it dries crystal clear, and fills the entire gap around the window.

Due to the wicking action and surface tension, it stays in the gap (and only in the gap) unless you apply an excessive amount.

Boss 429 wheels.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Bainford said:

Headlight lenses and other small parts can be attached using clear paint, either acrylic, enamel, or lacquer. I've used Future for small clear parts as well.

Agree with you Trevor. I also use clear fingernail polish for its viscosity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Rick L said:

I also use clear fingernail polish for its viscosity.

Nail polish is a fairly "hot" lacquer which could craze clear parts.  But I guess it if is applied sparingly to the edge of the clear part, that won't  be much of an issue. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good luck products I have used thru the years are Zap Canopy Glue, Gallery Glass - crystal clear glue from JoAnns Fabrics. The last couple of builds I have tried the new Revell Contacta Clear and I'm pleased with the results. I will still use just straight Future Floor Wax for head lights and taillights, also works great for sealing instrument gauges and decals on the interior. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use the Donn Yost method.  Hold windshield in place tightly, apply Bondene with those small fuzzy things (can’t think of the name), hold for a few seconds, and done.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I mostly use epoxy or Testors canopy glue if the fit is perfect and it's a small piece. The epoxy can be a good bond for those windows that only have a couple of places that allow glue to be applied if you know what I'm meaning.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
23 hours ago, conchan said:

What’s the best way to install clear parts, windscreens, headlights, etc., without causing fogging or leaving unsightly glue residue behind?  
I’ve been using regular Tamiya Cement.
Thanks for the help.  
Stay safe and enjoy!

Well there's your problem right there.  Do not use that for clear parts.  Everyone that has posted so far has gave great viable options.  Canopy glue, BSI gold+, even AK has a glue for clear parts and photo etch, 2 part epoxy, mod podge.  Lots of viable options for clear parts.  Get these for your small glue applications too there worth every penny.  500 for like $7 much cheaper than the ones from micro mark 100 for $15.  Quality of cotton are great on them too.  I own the over priced micro mark ones and there the same thing except the micro mark ones are smaller in length that's all. 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09LCC99W3?psc=1&ref=ppx_yo2ov_dt_b_product_details

Edited by Dpate
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use the Donn Yost method.  Hold windshield in place tightly, apply Bondene with those small fuzzy things (can’t think of the name), hold for a few seconds, and done.  Ok, smartalecs, micro applicator brushes.

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

OMG guys, Thanx for the lulz this morning, I needed that!

Actually, I have some of those 'fuzzy things' but never thought of using them for applying glue, I will try that next time. 👍

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/25/2022 at 2:21 AM, Bills72sj said:

I actually use Testors red tube cement but sparingly ONLY on a couple of hidden places with a toothpick to "tack weld" the window in place initially.

I usually clamp it in place with wooden clothes pins.

The next day I use Testors window maker and wick it around the perimeter of the window on one or two sides depending.

On subsequent days I apply it until the entire perimeter is sealed.

Window maker has no solvent reaction whatsoever, it dries crystal clear, and fills the entire gap around the window.

Due to the wicking action and surface tension, it stays in the gap (and only in the gap) unless you apply an excessive amount.

Boss 429 wheels.JPG

Man i thought that was a real garage for a min lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to try super glue, but the fogging stopped that quick. One thing I did learn was a q-tip lightly soaked in alcohol would clean most or all the fog off the glass without harming it, then I used another q=tip to apply Novus clean & shine.  Looked pretty good. Now I use plati-weld to tack in place and then canopy glue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
46 minutes ago, Leica007 said:

I used to try super glue, but the fogging stopped that quick. One thing I did learn was a q-tip lightly soaked in alcohol would clean most or all the fog off the glass without harming it, then I used another q=tip to apply Novus clean & shine.  Looked pretty good. Now I use plati-weld to tack in place and then canopy glue.

BSI SUPER-GOLD+ (odorless) CA glue does not cause fogging. (yes, it is slightly more expensive than standard CA).  Using BSI accelerator to quickly set any CA also prevents fogging (since the glue has no time to start evaporating).  If the clear window is first dipped in Future (or whatever the current name is for that stuff) and will minimize plain CA fogging.

 

500001263.jpgbsi-insta-set-ca-accelerator-activator-r

I use both myself.

Edited by peteski
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow! 
Thanks to everyone who took the time to reply to my query. It is greatly appreciated. I never knew there were so many alternatives. I’ try and find the products recommended here and give them a try.  Again thanks for all the help. 
 

stay safe and enjoy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

In the interest of science, I recently bought some JB Weld UV-curing glue from Home Depot to see how it would work for airplane canopies and car clear parts. I had gotten good results from some other stuff I’d found in the “As seen on TV” section of Walgreens a few years ago. The old stuff hardened to a hard rubber consistency but held the parts well. This new JB Weld cured to a harder consistency and was very strong. Only problem is the tube seems to have a very short shelf life, like days. At ten bucks, it’s a little too pricey for one- or two-time use!

Also, no kittens were harmed during the experiment.

Ben

Edited by Ben Brown
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...